2018

19.04 - 30.06

EARTH & SKY

Neal Beggs
Nicolas Bourthoumieux
James Bridle
Marc Buchy
Mark Geffriaud & Géraldine Longueville 
Jakub Geltner
Marco Godinho
Mishka Henner
Douglas Huebler
Pierre-Philippe Hofmann
Julien Levesque & Albertine Meunier
Heinz Mack
Jonathan Monk
Dennis Oppenheim
Jon Rafman
Ed Ruscha
Joachim Schmid
Robert Smithson & Nancy Holt
UVA
Kris Van Dessel

Clement Valla
a.o.

Sat  21.04

Sun 22.04

 


Sat 05.05
Sat 19.05
Sat 02.06
Sat 30.06

2 pm
2 pm

 


7 pm
3 pm
8 pm
8
pm

ACTIVATION
VERNISSAGE

APERO
WALK
APERO
FINISSAGE

Dennis Oppenheim's Target (1974) at Tour & Taxis Park

Art Brussels


 

with Downtown Brussels Art Weekend
with Marco Godinho in Molenbeek
with Nick Oberthaler + Manuel Burgener + MOREpublishers

 

‘The major sculptural innovation of the 60’s is the horizontal viewpoint opened to a traditionally vertical art form, a fact that finally distinguishes sculpture from most architecture and, except for the linear, perspective depth implied, from painting. Vertical alignment is anthropomorphic, immediate, but static; the horizontal incorporates time, distance, and is experienced, and measured, kinaesthetically. This is a logical result of the jet age. Floor sculpture is seen from an aerial viewpoint. Man sees everything differently once he has flown.’ _ From: Introduction to ‘557.087’, Lucy R. Lippard.

The exhibition researches the influence of technology on the perception of the contemporary landscape. The shift in perspective, going from the horizontal to the vertical one, changed not only our view but also our understanding of the world. This shift not only has a spatial but also a political besides a philosophical dimension, blurring the boundaries between observation and supervision, private and public, objectivism and subjectivism. The democratisation of ground and air mobility, with car and plane as instruments of motion, and camera’s and satellites as instruments of transmission, pushed the diffusion of the vertical perspective from military monopoly to artistic expression. The exhibition ‘Earth & Sky’ therefor is divided in three chapters which contemplate the contemporary landscape through the perspective of walking, driving and flying, trying to establish a dialogue in between algorithmic and romantic conceptual art - following the route of the material and the immaterial, in free fall between image and imagination.

Images: Leslie Artamonow