2019

25.04 - 29.06

CALCULATED CHANCE

Eva Barto
Jérémie Bennequin
Claude Closky
David de Tscharner
Herman de Vries
Karen Ann Donnachie & Andy Simionato
Robert Filliou
Michel François
Marine Hugonnier
Christian Jankowski
JODI

Ellsworth Kelly

LAb[au]

Sébastien Lacomblez

Man Ray
Manfred Mohr

Jonathan Monk
Frieder Nake
Michalis Pichler

Yann Sérandour & Julie C. Fortier

Peter Struycken
Gerhard von Graevenitz
Elsa Werth
a.o.

25 - 27.04

Sun  28.04

05 - 06.05

Sat 29.06

11 am - 7 pm

12:30 pm - 4 pm

12 pm - 6 pm

8 pm
 

Art Brussels 

Opening Reception

Downtown Brussels Art Weekend

Closing party

‘Process art is chance, contingency and indetermination’

Robert Morris

There are many ways to approach ‘chance’, be it on a philosophical, a mathematical or artistic level. Common to all of them is a certain level of unpredictability and uncertainty which brings into its definition the realm of probabilities. Chance is about something to come, a process or something unknown to happen.

In the past century artists have developed various methods and processes to trigger chance. Beginning largely with the DADA movement in the late 1910s, artists have incorporated elements of chance in the creation and presentation of their work. This development is thought to have been inspired by a loss of faith in ordered Western civilization in the wake of World War I, as well by the development of relativist principles in fields ranging from quantum physics to psychology to Eastern philosophy. Jean Arp composed collages by dropping shapes at random while Marcel Duchamp recorded the patterns formed by dropped strings; both reduced the status of the artist’s conscious decisions in creating an artwork.

‘I set the rules but led chance exceed intent’

John Cage

Since then chance operations have become a recurrent technique, strategy and reflection in art; from automatic writing in abstract art to performative and process-oriented rules in FLUXUS or conditional statements in conceptual art. Stochastic

principles entered in artistic explorations in early computational works. Based on these considerations many contemporary artists use chance without losing control, trying to master, direct or even stage chance. It is precisely this interplay between control and the unforeseen, the planned and the surprise that the exhibition deliberately explores.

The exhibition stages works by artists who let go control and let in chance while exploring operations of probability, combinatory, contingency and serendipity.

9.1.jpg
1.jpg
2.jpg
3.jpg
6.jpg
7.jpg
8.jpg
5.jpg
37.jpg
4.jpg
14.1.jpg
10.jpg
11.jpg
13.jpg
12.jpg
15.jpg
16.jpg
16.1.jpg
17.jpg
18.1.jpg
16.2.jpg
20.jpg
19.jpg
21.jpg
22.jpg
23.jpg
24.jpg
25.jpg
26.jpg
26.2.jpg
26.1.jpg
26.3.jpg
27.2.jpg
27.jpg
27.1.jpg
29.jpg
29.1.jpg
30.jpg
30.1.jpg
35.jpg
32.jpg
31.jpg
33.jpg